Size dependent properties continue to spur significant scientific and technological interest because of the ongoing miniaturization of devices. However, many fundamental questions remain unanswered, especially for metallic glasses.  Specifically, how do we explain the existence of size effects in amorphous materials such as metallic glasses, which lack lattice-based microstructures typically used to conceptualize size effects in crystalline materials.  In particular on the nanoscale we focus on the effect of size on mechanical, rheological, and thermophysical properties. In addition to the technology driven interest, the study of size effects is also expected to help understanding materials in general. For example in metallic glasses, deformation behavior of small samples helps understand their macroscopic deformation.

Summary of the proposed size effects for metallic glasses.  Quantitative numbers are for a midrange metallic glass like a Zr-based. A second length scale is added for cellular metallic glasses indicating the transition from plastic yielding to elastic buckling.

Summary of the proposed size effects for metallic glasses. Quantitative numbers are for a midrange metallic glass like a Zr-based. A second length scale is added for cellular metallic glasses indicating the transition from plastic yielding to elastic buckling.

We can fabricate nanosize metallic glass rods in large quantity (~0.1 mg). This allows for precise calorimetric characterization of the effect of size on thermophysical properties.

We can fabricate nanosize metallic glass rods in large quantity (~0.1 mg). This allows for precise calorimetric characterization of the effect of size on thermophysical properties.

Our fabrication method allows us to produce nano size BMG rods for mechanical characterization. For example, the deformation mode can be determined as the function of the BMGs’ sample diameter, height, and temperature.

Our fabrication method allows us to produce nano size BMG rods for mechanical characterization. For example, the deformation mode can be determined as the function of the BMGs’ sample diameter, height, and temperature.